Legitimate Home Based Internet Business Information

Are you someone that wants to find a legitimate home based Internet business? Well, for those that need help to learn what to look for, you should know you have come to the right article. Before you get started with your home based business, there is some information you will need to know:

You need to figure out what business you will be doing online in order to determine if you need a website or not. Virtual assistants and stuff like that will not require a website. However, if you are selling stuff from your home, then you may want to create a blog or website. Affiliate marketing will definitely require a website. You may say that there are online auctions you can sell your products. However, the only problem with those websites is the fees they take out for selling. Of course, you’re paying for them advertising your products on their website.

When you want to sell products online, there are a lot of things you will need to do if you want to do it from your own website. Those things would be promoting, advertising, and adding article content on the website that contains SEO. If you want to know another legit business, you may find article marketing or video marketing to be a good business. Video marketing takes skills in editing videos and promoting clients in videos.

The article content marketing can be a very good business; all you need is a team of writers and a good website that can pull traffic everyday. You will find that most businesses do start from scratch and can be shaky through the first few years, but once you get established, you will do fantastic.

We all know that many legitimate home based Internet businesses have a slow start off, but that depends on what route you go. You may find that many people do make a living off home businesses, why cant you?

Finding a legit home based business may seem like such an obsticle to find, but it really isn’t.

The answer to finding a true legit home business is right in front of you. The internet is full of unlimited resouces to find a business that fits your personality and interest.

You can go on the search engine and look up scam reports, user reviews, success stories and so forth. The key is to get legit information from real people who have already tried your prospective home business.

Your Goal is to find those who have already test driven your prospective home business before you gamble any of your own money into it.

Small Business Information

So you have had it with the 9 to 5, your sick of your boss always looking over your shoulder, and the idea of you doing all the work so the executives can reap all the benefits makes you sick to your stomach. So you have decided to go out on your own and start a new business. That is a great idea and I am here to help you with some of the tougher questions that may come to mind.

What’s next? Well you need to decide how you will structure your business for tax and liability purposes. If you do nothing, and start the business alone, you are considered a sole proprietor. If you do nothing and start the business with someone else, that business will be considered a partnership. You can also form a corporation or limited liability company (LLC). The last two options are a bit harder to set up, but the liability is passed on to the business and not yourself or your partners. You should seek the advice of an accounting expert before making this decision; once the decision is made it is difficult to change the company type and it’s an accounting nightmare.

Sole proprietorship and partnerships are taxed on your normal 1040. You figure out how much money the business brought in and how much was spent on the business. This is the number you add to your 1040. This option is very easy for taxes very easy to run. The main problem with sole proprietors and partnerships is you can become personally responsible for all debt and damages. For example, if you run into credit problems with your suppliers they can come after you and your partners for payment. Also, any damage that your company may cause and is unable to make restitution for could become your personal financial obligation. This includes liens on personal property.

To distance yourself from personal liability you need to form a corporation (INC, C, or Corp) or a limited liability company (LLC). Both of these allow the business to become a separate entity for tax purposes and liability. The downside to these types of businesses is the extra paperwork needed to stay compliant and start up costs. You can search the internet for companies that will form your corporation or LLC, but you need to make sure they are reputable and not online scams.

If you start a corporation or LLC you will need a tax expert that specializes in small business and good accounting software. The government will send you an Employer Identification Number. This is the company’s unique id number, think of it like your social security number. This number needs to be used on all documents pertaining to the company, as well as all tax forms.

All parts of the business must to be kept separate from your personal life. You need different bank accounts, different phone numbers, and different credit cards. Next to making a profit this will be your biggest and most important challenge. If you mix funds or you are sloppy with book keeping, the corporate veil can be pierced and that means you can become personally liable for the company and its actions.

I recommend a good CPA and a lawyer. These can be found online within your area and are well worth the upfront money. After you are set up it is possible to do all the taxes and accounting yourself with powerful accounting software, but this is time consuming and may not be worth it to some. Remember starting a new business can be fun and rewarding; just stick to the rules and laws.

Catering Business Information – An Ideal Venture for You

Do you want to earn extra income? Then start a catering business now. Creating a catering business might not be too hard but it is definitely risky. Venturing in this kind of business needs your skills to capture the taste of countless people and discovering the fine art of preparing food. Like any other types of business, of course where you invest your hard earned money, you hope to make the business grow. It is indeed necessary that you got to be prepared and wise from the very beginning of the business venture. You cannot just go through the business venture lacking any preparations and knowledge of being a caterer.

There are some things that need to be considered in opening a catering business so that it will succeed in the long run. Besides hiring a caterer, you must device a business plan to be your guide. It would be better to put into writing the ideas which are playing in your mind the moment you think of opening a catering business. This business plan must include goals classified into short term and long term and also the activities and plans that you want to carry out.

The business plan must also have manpower, investment needed as the marketing initiatives. This will be your reference and guide in making your catering business successful. Whatever plans you have for the business, it would be of help if you include the feasibility and profitability of your plans. The initial cost should be taken into consideration before putting up the catering business. The costs include salaries for the chef and first few employees; cost for the utensils and the industrialized kitchen you will work with. The next thing to focus is the definite regulations and rules of the local health department.

It is important to check the local health department and check the regulations that apply to you. You might need to check out laws governing your business and might need to get permits. This might save you from any problems that may occur later on. It might be of help if you will hire an expert to manage legal matters. Aside from the business plan, marketing strategy is a must for the business. You must know how to capture the taste of the potential customers with no spending lavishly on the ingredients. It is also to think of ways on how to reach the target market. In addition, you have to make a way in keeping a good business relationship with them.

Word of mouth is one of the best ways to market and promote your catering business. Therefore, you have to make it a point to make a goof impression on every customer that comes to your business. Another thing to promote your business is through networking. Never miscalculate the power of having connections. Other people go for charity and volunteer works or organize fund raising events. Clients will come to your business and there is a possibility that they will be your regular customers. Printed coupons and flyers can also be effective in promoting your catering business. In the opening, discount can be given to the first few customers so they can become loyal customers.

In opening a catering business, one must be ready for all the risks since all business ventures come with risks so make sure to be well-prepared when starting your business. Being ready and prepared increase your opportunity of creating a profitable business. Business people know that it’s hard to gain potential customers but it is even harder to keep the loyal customers to continue and stay to support you. However, these risks can turn into something profitable as long as you have expert and friendly caterer and the business plan and marketing strategy are prepared well.

Keep Your Business Information Quiet: Loose Lips Sink Companies

We have this idea that computer hackers are ingeniously bright people. We hear stories, true or otherwise, as to how they seem to finagle valuable information from us, using the most sophisticated social engineering techniques. In reality, they often use such tricky questions as, “I’m calling from the IT Department. We’re doing some system checks on your T-3 line. I’ll need to reprogram your current password with a new one. You’re using the one that’s all letters, right?”

And so we dutifully comply with what seems to be a reasonable and logical request from some resident authority figure who surely has our best interests in mind. Often within minutes, we will reveal confidential company or personal information, over the phone, or through an email reply to a complete stranger who talks or writes a good line.

Reading all this and reflecting on your own sense of eternal security vigilance, you’ll swear that you’d never give out a byte of confidential or important data, over the phone, across cyberspace, or even face-to-face. Your motto is: “Hang me up by my thumbs for a week and I still wouldn’t even tell you my first name.”

And all this may be true when you believe the information requester may be a wolf in sheep’s leggings, but how about when the asker-to-be is from your local or national news media? Are you still tight-lipped and careful, or do you get caught up in the glow of the First Amendment’s pad and pen, the video camera, or the microphone? It’s hard for even savvy security professionals not to spill some beans when faced with the often flattering request for information and a chance to demonstrate subject matter expertise.

But just as loose lips sink ships, the desire to provide information to the media must be measured by the impact, or more accurately, the harms a few words or figures can betray.

Several years ago, the Business section of the Orange County (Calif.) Register, featured a two-page photo spread on the history of the Southland Corporation’s reason for being: the 7-11 store. Along with a history of the Big Gulp business, the piece featured an interview with Anaheim 7-11 franchisee Herb Domeño, owner of nine stores, including the site at Katella and Harbor. For those not familiar with southern California real estate, this prime property is directly adjacent to an Enchanted Kingdom knows as Disneyland.

Back then, Mr. Domeño’s stone’s throw-to-Disneyland convenience store boasted the highest sales volume in the country – an average of $3 million per year, clearly above the national sales-per-store average of about $1.3 million per year.

Taking out our trusty calculators, we could have determined that, give or take some up or down days in the boom-boom 1990’s, Mr. Domeño’s enterprise took in about $8,000 per day.

And how did we discern this figure? It’s easy to uncover, especially when the $3 million sales amount is featured boldly in the photo caption of Mr. Domeño in his cash-cow store. (By the way, the new national sales record for one 7-11 convenience store belongs to the folks running the show in Southampton, NY.

So what has the Orange County Register just told every enterprising convenience store robber who can read? This place is full of cash and even if they aren’t cleaning up like they did before Disneyland closed a nearby parking lot to make room for its California Adventure addition, Mr. Stickup Artist has to believe it’s worth a shot.

Even if the daily revenue figure is adjusted for slow days and customers who pay with debit or credit cards, it’s still a substantial amount of cash that is either on the premises or being moved, via some safe means we hope, to the bank.

In times of organizational crisis, it’s wise to have a designated member of the executive team speak to the print or TV media. This person will have the training, experience, and savvy to say the right things, at the right times. News gatherers, on the other hand, won’t always seek out your Director of Corporate Communications (or similarly-titled representative). If they want the juicy details, any gossip, or the “inside story,” they might go to any executive or manager they can find, or worse, to an employee, who gives an opinion as if it was a fact.

In a perfect world, the security professional would also be part of the discussion and review of any press release, placed article, or editorial coming from the organization that has any security-related content. “Facts and figures” statements tossed out like: “Our security system is so sophisticated it only takes one guard per eight-hour shift to operate it,” or “Our jewelry store revenues have never been higher” might be great PR, but they can turn your business into a new target, by people or groups who never considered it as one before.

If you’re tasked with speaking to a media member about any aspect of your business operations or performance, choose your words carefully. Use the technique every politician is trained in from birth: bridging. Bridging simply requires you to “bridge over” to the question you want to answer versus the question you’re asked.

This approach works best when you’re asked the question you don’t really want to answer, i.e. Reporter: “Isn’t it true that your firm’s movement to stricter access control has created a `prison camp environment’ for your employees and customers?” Security Professional: “As you know, our approach has always been to put the safety and security needs of our people and our customers first. As such, we believe in creating the best working environment possible…”

Get the idea? You don’t answer a direct, confrontive question with a direct, assertive answer on point. You vary the response to make sure you cover your points, not theirs.
When in doubt, choose to be bland, especially with any information that hints of having a financial, proprietary, or trade-secret connection. “We’ve got a good handle on our inventory” sounds so much better than, “We’ve got a ton of expensive stuff laying around our warehouse.”

The old adage all publicity is good publicity has its exceptions. Better for people to read about your firm and have to make assumptions about your security, than to know too much detail.